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returning from his vacation overnight. and he is already on the defense over the latest details in the nsa spying scandal. >> reporter: good morning. the white house says the violation don't reflect any willful law breaking. the detail report white house aides say nsa is aggressively monitoring itself. more documents leaked about the nsa the national secure agency listening in on people's phone calls or reading their emails and failing to report their violations to the frn isa court. some members of congress find the latest leak about the nsa more troubling. senator rand paul wants to take the scandal to the highest court in the land. >> the only way to fine justice you have to hear both side. there needs to be a discussion from people who are a little bit more skeptical of the nsa in an open court, i think, before the supreme court on this program. >> reporter: the latest information comes from documents that nsa leaker edward snowden released. they detail thousands of privacy violations made by nsa. president obama denies the government is abusing the programs. congressman pete king who
by the nsa to investigate americans and then being order to cover it up. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. jeff bezos is buying the washington post, one of the leading newspapers in the country. the amazon.com founder and chief executive is one of the wealthiest people in the united states. he will pay $250 million for the post and a number of , less than one percent of his wealth, which is estimated at more than 28 billion dollars. he is a friend of donald graham, chief effective of the washington post company, whose family has owned the newspaper for eight decades. over the past the gate, the companies newspaper division a seen a 44% drop in operating revenue. in addition, he will get another -- a number of other washington post owned businesses. the deal does not include slate.com or foreign-policy magazine, which are own by the parent company that also owns kaplan and will change its name following the sale of the paper. he said management of the washington post newspaper will remain the same, but it
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
to provide temporary asylum to the nsa leaker, edward snowden, or even russia's high-profile arrest recently of a u.s. diplomat who they have accused of being a cia spy and who they perp walked to a great effect. it's not even just russia's decision to ban american couples from adopting russian children. it's also russia's recent spate of anti-gay legislation which has drawn lots of criticism from the west, and some calls that the world should boycott the upcoming winter olympics that are due to be held in russia next year. >> i know that one question that's been raised is how do we approach the olympics? i want to just make very clear right now i do not think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. we've got a bunch of americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed. nobody's more offended than me by some of the anti-gay and lesbian legislation you've been seeing in russia, but as i said just this week, i've spoken out against that not just with respect to russia, but a number of other countries where we continue to do work with them but have a stro
harman, and the nsa former nsansel. -- general counsel. this is one hour, 10 minutes. >> the title of this panel, as you see, is counterterrorism, national security, and the rule of law. the tension between what the law demands and what the national defense requires is, in essence, what this panel is about. we are pleased to have one of america's premier investigative journalists. mike joined nbc news in 2010 as the national investigative correspondent. we all know he covered, among other things, the boston marathon bombing and the newtown shooting massacre. he appears regularly on nbc news. he is also the author of new york times best-selling books "hubris" and also "uncovering clinton." go ahead. >> thank you. and i want to thank you again for assembling great panels every year. you get newsmakers and future newsmakers to serve on these panels. last year, i served on a panel with paula broadwell. while i do not expect any of our distinguished panelists to make news like that this year, i think they will all be in the spotlight in some form. to my left, the general counsel of the
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
germany. >> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitress, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for her work, for her films, she found she gets stopped a lot at the airport and not anything like what you might get stopped for at the airport for. she's been stopped dozens and dozens of times at the airport. for interrogations that sometimes last for hours. miss poitress started taking extraordinary precautions with her data using encrypted e-mail, working on computers that were not connected to the internet. stashing her notes in safe deposit boxes. she kept on, though, getting stopped at the airport. starting in 2006, she was detained and questioned like that more than 40 times. in april of last year, salon.com wrote about what had been happening to laura poitress as she tried to travel, then finally, finally after that public attention, and that article from salon.com, the airport interrogations of laura poitras stopped. she found, okay, she can
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
fighter program. art probably nsa ch looks like. "washington journal" is live every day as 7 a.m. eastern. >> let's begin with a very well- known novelist. what brought you? thiswas born a negro in country and welcome deeply. there was no reason not to be involved what is considered the most important and most noted demonstration to free americans. until recently, like most americans, i have expressed my support of civil rights by talking largely about at cocktail parties. summer,y americans this i could no longer pay lip service to a cause that was urgently right and in a time that is so urgently now. tvsunday, american history marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with historic and contemporary roundtable discussions. we will have a visit to that gallery, a theater performance of the 1960s civil rights movements. it starts at 1 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv come every weekend on c-span 3. next is a discussion about the state of the u.s. economy with a former white house economic adviser and the ceo of him co-, the largest bond fund in the world, and chairman
're following on "world news now." >>> nsa whistle-blower edward snowden has left the airport in moscow for the first time in more than a month. awarded temporary asylum by russia. and he's now in an undisclosed location in russia. the white house reportedly furious. >>> strong reaction to russia's announcement to enforce a new law that cwn on gay rights activism during next year's winter olympics. some gay supporters in the u.s. are asking for a boycott on russian products, vodka and participating in the games themselves. >>> one day after another session of record nighs on wall street, traders and investors are eagerly awaiting the july jobs report later this morning, expected to indicate a strengthening job market. >>> in the mountains of northern georgia, rescue crews had to pull two frightened teenagers to safely after a flash flood swept their truck on to a small island. more rains expected in the southeast today. those are some of our top stories on this friday, august 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good friday morning. we have tai filling in for d
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- span.org. couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this write up this morning, he said -- that ist abt the strategy on the republican side. on the democratic s
-- on foreign-policy, -- this headline from "the washington post" -- -- that is the nsa leaks, the former nsa staffer, edward snowden, the reporter who first worked on that. there will be more on that story in today's new york times. on our democratic line from pennsylvania. pat, we are talking the president's priorities. we have gone over a few foreign- policy issues. what do you think the top priority should be, foreign or domestic policy? the top priority should be foreign-policy. in particular, a complete disconnection from the state of israel, which we are now finding is a nation leading israeli intelligence officers. these are the american equivalent of the fbi director, cia director, who are now creating a state of israel like not to germany. when secretary kerry detained the leading state department ,fficial of the united states the statement was, at least i can go where i want now. host: where are you getting your information? caller: i know this for a fact. there are photographs of netanyahu on the walls. host: how do you know this as a fact? explain where you get your facts from. c
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
was the nsa and their search of the american e-mail and the compiling of metadata about the phone calls of americans. collects relations have come to light recently that there were times when the line was crossed. that demonstrates that those mechanisms were in place and the court ruling that that program was unconstitutional in 2011 and setting it aside and ending it was another example of how the process works. we have to continue to focus on striking that balance. >> missile controversy seems to have done something that a lot of people were not thought possible. that is forging a common ground between the libertarians and the liberal side of the democratic party. you get a sense that this is going to be the kind of the finding issue going forward that may be, say, the iraq war was? >> i do not have a sense that this will be a defining issue in that way. as is particularly because unlike the iraq war, where president bush was in office and very affirmatively differed with the democratic base and with face of the entire country where most americans felt that with the wrong war at the w
the president close. is it nsa stuff, what is it? it has become more common since the late 1990s to talk about this. obviously because the country did it, went through it in '98 with president clinton. it's not, you know, impeachment is always a political tool. there's always some political element to it, obviously, because there is no definition of high crimes and misdemeanors. what is that? every generation, every congress, whoever wants to do it can redefine it. it's a kind of crazy armageddon. and i think that it's a sign of a certain derangement as we've talked about a lot on the part of any opponent of an incumbent president to go to this because you're trying to delegitimize the president who holds the office. it happened when conservatives did it with bush. it happened with conservatives and clinton that was strong push to delegitimize the president and a lot of people did not believe deserved to be president and that's what this talk is about now. it's the deepest, most significant kind of attack that you could make on a president and it will be interesting to see if it's coburn just
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
questions about his canceled meeting with russian president putin as well as the debt ceiling and nsa surveillance. we will bring it to you live at 3:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. next, former president george w. bush on immigration during a naturalization ceremony at the bush institute on july 10. following the ceremony, the institute hosted a series of panels looking at immigrant contributions to america. this is about two hours. >> wonderful. for theu, jim, introduction. thank you, ambassador. thank you immigrants who are joining us today and thank you to our audience here and watching us. this is being streamed on bushcenter.org. thank you. mentioned weador are here in texas. this is a relevant topic. it is relevant to american nationwide. especially to those of us in the lone star state caret it is an interesting comparison. growthject is the 4% project. we are trying to get u.s. gdp doubled rate it is now. in recent times, we have been growing 2.5% per year. we know we can do better. one way we know we can do better is that in the past we have grown a lot faster. over the past4% 60
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
did not request miranda's detention. greenwald is the reporter who exposed the details of the nsa surveillance program. >>> now to idaho, where authorities are allowing evacuees to return home. miguel is in ketchum, idaho. >> reporter: this is one of the most iconic most historic towns in this region. today because of the work of firefighters it and thousands of homes in this area are safe for now. not far from the heart of idaho's massive inferno, today firefighters are gaining ground, containment lines protect communities in the path of the fire. only one home lost, thousands saved. the "x" factor here, wind. worried flying embers will spread fire, a fleet of 30 aircraft have pounded the fast-moving blaze. the fire fight in the air is just as dangerous as it is on the ground. pilots face thick smoke and stiff winds, but their role in this firefight is critical. the aerial assault protected towns like sun valley but the community is now a ghost town. this man opened his restaurant doors last year but the fire has crippled his business. >> right about now, this time of year, stree
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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